Robert L. Wilkins, Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and Advocate for a National Museum for African-American History and Culture

Robert L. WilkinsWhen efforts stalled to open a national museum for African- American history and culture, Judge Robert L. Wilkins left his position with the Public Defenders Office to serve as Chair of the Site and Building Committee for the National Museum for African-American History and Culture.

Robert L. Wilkins, Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and Advocate for a National Museum for African-American History and Culture2020-08-06T15:19:44-04:00

History of the E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse

E._Barrett_Prettyman_Federal_Courthouse,_DC

President Harry Truman used a silver trowel to lay the cornerstone for Prettyman Courthouse in 1950. A member of the Masons, he probably saw the irony in laying the cornerstone, but more ironic is the site was occupied by the Masons' Jackson Hall, named after an earlier Masonic President, Andrew Jackson.
History of the E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse2019-02-11T20:19:57-05:00

In re Judith Miller – National Security and the Reporter’s Privilege

The full program on video of In re Judith Miller, a Society-sponsored program that explored the common-law basis for a reporter's privilege and how best to strike the balance between the public's right to know and the Government's need to secure information in the national interest. The program began with remarks by Professor David Pozen of Columbia Law School.

In re Judith Miller – National Security and the Reporter’s Privilege2019-08-22T02:37:30-04:00

From Tyler TX to the White House: Harry C. McPherson

Harry C. McPherson

Harry McPherson was a prototypical Washington lawyer. Born in Tyler, Texas and educated at Southern Methodist University, the University of the South, and the University of Texas Law School, he landed his first job in Washington in 1956 with, not surprisingly, Texas Senator Lyndon Johnson.
From Tyler TX to the White House: Harry C. McPherson2019-04-18T23:05:22-04:00

John D. Aldock, a Master of Reinvention

John Aldock

This career filled with adventure began by clerking for D.C. District Judge Luther Youngdahl, who he describes as looking like "God in the Sistine Chapel." In Aldock's telling, Youngdahl is larger than life.
John D. Aldock, a Master of Reinvention2018-12-10T19:13:11-05:00

The Art of Cross-Examination: Historical and Current Perspectives

On July 26, 2006, the Historical Society staged a reenactment of the cross examination of a government witness from the Independent Counsel prosecution of former Secretary of Agriculture, Michael Espy. The Honorable James Robertson presided over this unique program and moderated a discussion among the participants afterward on the art of cross examination and the unusual challenges presented by the Espy trial.

The Art of Cross-Examination: Historical and Current Perspectives2019-04-18T01:55:13-04:00
  • The Department of Justice filed an antitrust suit against software giant Microsoft in the District Court for the District of Columbia alleging Microsoft’s “Windows” program dominated the market for “Operating Systems,” and used its dominance in that market to destroy competition in markets for other software.

Technology

The Department of Justice filed an antitrust suit against software giant Microsoft in the District Court for the District of Columbia alleging Microsoft’s “Windows” program dominated the market for “Operating Systems,” and used its dominance in that market to destroy competition in markets for other software.

Technology2023-03-31T15:33:36-04:00

The Library of Congress and the D.C. Circuit

The Library of Congress, which celebrates the 222nd anniversary of its founding on April 24th, 2022, is one of the world’s greatest cultural institutions. The bulk of the collections consists of chambers papers, which are considered to be the personal property of the individual judges who generated them.

The Library of Congress and the D.C. Circuit2022-04-01T10:23:18-04:00

Madness or Badness: Duran and the Evolution of the Insanity Defense in the D.C. Circuit

During this April 2012 program, University of Pennsylvania professor Stephen J. Morse described the insanity defense as giving legal life to the moral values of fairness and responsibility that the Supreme Court should uphold as a constitutional right.

Madness or Badness: Duran and the Evolution of the Insanity Defense in the D.C. Circuit2024-01-21T16:36:00-05:00