“Women in the Life and Law of the D.C. Circuit Courts”

The "Women in the Life and Law of the D.C. Circuit Courts" Historical Society program, held June 2013 brought together judges, administrators, law clerks, and practicing attorneys, each with direct experience in our courts, to discuss the past, present, and future of women in the Courts of the D.C. Circuit.

“Women in the Life and Law of the D.C. Circuit Courts”2019-03-02T02:34:39-05:00
  • On April 12, 2013, 75 students from six D.C. public high schools and two private schools had the unusual opportunity of arguing in the federal courthouse before federal judges in the eighth Mock Court Program sponsored by the Historical Society. Nine judges heard the arguments and selected an outstanding advocate in each of their courtrooms-with each winner receiving a monetary prize from the Society.

8th Annual Mock Court Argument Program

On April 12, 2013, 75 students from six D.C. public high schools and two private schools had the unusual opportunity of arguing in the federal courthouse before federal judges in the eighth Mock Court Program sponsored by the Historical Society. Nine judges heard the arguments and selected an outstanding advocate in each of their courtrooms-with each winner receiving a monetary prize from the Society.

8th Annual Mock Court Argument Program2019-03-07T20:45:00-05:00

Madness or Badness: Duran and the Evolution of the Insanity Defense in the D.C. Circuit

During this April 2012 program, University of Pennsylvania professor Stephen J. Morse described the insanity defense as giving legal life to the moral values of fairness and responsibility that the Supreme Court should uphold as a constitutional right.

Madness or Badness: Duran and the Evolution of the Insanity Defense in the D.C. Circuit2024-01-21T16:38:13-05:00

The D.C. Circuit in the McCarthy Era: United States v. Lattimore

A ruling in the mid 1950's by a federal judge in the D.C. Circuit almost single-handedly started turning the judicial tide against the "red scare" generated by Senator Joseph McCarthy and others, according to a panel presented by the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit in May 2011.

The D.C. Circuit in the McCarthy Era: United States v. Lattimore2019-03-02T01:28:49-05:00
  • One hundred students from ten Washington area high schools appeared in Federal Court on April 8, 2011 to argue cases before U.S. District Court judges. The students, practicing their litigation skills, were from 10 schools (Columbia Heights Education Campus, Coolidge, Idea PCS, Maret, McKinley Tech, National Cathedral, School Without Walls, St. Albans, Theodore Roosevelt, and H.D. Woodson) and presented their arguments to 11 judges.

7th Annual Mock Court Argument Program

One hundred students from ten Washington area high schools appeared in Federal Court on April 8, 2011 to argue cases before U.S. District Court judges. The students, practicing their litigation skills, were from 10 schools (Columbia Heights Education Campus, Coolidge, Idea PCS, Maret, McKinley Tech, National Cathedral, School Without Walls, St. Albans, Theodore Roosevelt, and H.D. Woodson) and presented their arguments to 11 judges.

7th Annual Mock Court Argument Program2019-03-07T20:50:02-05:00

Who Solved Watergate? A Panel Discussion

Celebrating its 20th anniversary, the Historical Society presented a program at the D.C. Circuit's Judicial Conference on June 9, 2010. Panelists, all active participants in the Watergate drama, probed the conflicts, tensions and personalities of the individuals who, and institutions that, played a role in the Watergate events.

Who Solved Watergate? A Panel Discussion2019-03-02T15:38:40-05:00

Review of Agency Rules in the D.C. Circuit: Back to the Future?

In the 1970's influential judges on the D.C. Circuit engaged in a well-publicized debate about the appropriate scope of judicial review of federal agency rulemaking.

Review of Agency Rules in the D.C. Circuit: Back to the Future?2019-03-02T01:52:59-05:00

Timeless Elements of a Great Closing Argument: Lessons from the Teapot Dome Trials

In July 2009, Almost 200 people listened intently as Roger M. Adelman and William D. Nussbaum made closing arguments drawn directly from the transcripts of two of the Teapot Dome trials (United States v. Albert Fall and United States v. Edward Doheny), arguments that were actually made by defense counsel Frank Hogan and Special Prosecutor and future Supreme Court Justice Owen J.Roberts years ago.

Timeless Elements of a Great Closing Argument: Lessons from the Teapot Dome Trials2019-03-02T02:44:31-05:00

“FCC Indecency Cases in the D. C. Circuit: An Historical Perspective”

The Hon. Patricia M. Wald, Hon. Timothy B. Dyk and Hon. Glen O. Robinson discussed the FCC indecency cases heard in the D.C. Circuit in a wide-ranging panel discussion on October 14, 2008. The panel was moderated by Christopher J. Wright, Esq. Mr. Wright, who previously served as General Counsel of the FCC and argued the Action for Children's Television case before the en banc D.C. Circuit in 1994, provided an overview of the FCC's indecency jurisprudence.

“FCC Indecency Cases in the D. C. Circuit: An Historical Perspective”2019-03-01T23:36:49-05:00

“Technology in the Courtroom: Could it Change the Course of History?”

On July 31, 2008, the Historical Society sponsored "Technology in the Courtroom: Could it Change the Course of History?" The program explored the relative advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology to present evidence and arguments in a jury trial.

“Technology in the Courtroom: Could it Change the Course of History?”2019-03-02T02:36:39-05:00