Judicial Portraits
U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

Louis McComas
Louis Emory McComas

Dates Served
1905 - 1907

Biographical Sketch
Born October 28, 1846, near Hagerstown, MD
Died November 10, 1907, in Washington, DC

Federal Judicial Service:
Associate Justice, U. S. District Court for the District of Columbia [Supreme Court of the District of Columbia]
Received a recess appointment from Benjamin Harrison on November 17, 1892, to a seat vacated by Martin V. Montgomery; nominated to the same position by Benjamin Harrison on December 6, 1892; Confirmed by the Senate on January 25, 1893, and received commission on January 25, 1893. Service terminated on March 3, 1899, due to resignation.

Judge, U. S. Court of Appeals for District of Columbia Circuit
Received a recess appointment from Theodore Roosevelt on June 26, 1905, to a seat vacated by Martin F. Morris; nominated to the same position by Theodore Roosevelt on December 5, 1905; Confirmed by the Senate on December 6, 1905, and received commission on December 6, 1905. Service terminated on November 10, 1907, due to death.

Education:
Dickinson College, 1866
Read law, 1868

Professional Career:
Private practice, Hagerstown, Maryland, 1868-1892
Republican candidate for U.S. Rep. from Maryland, 1876
U.S. Representative from Maryland, 1883-1891
Republican candidate for U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland, 1890
Private practice, Baltimore, Maryland
U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1899-1905

Frame Dimensions
Oil on canvas 40" X 30"

Artist
Richard Norris Brooke (1847 - 1920), a native of Warrenton, Virginia, studied at the Pennsylvania Academy and then in Paris with Leon Bonnat, a realist and portrait painter. One of Mr. Brooke's paintings, Pastoral Visit, a portrait of an elderly black minister with a family of his parishioners, was for years one of the most popular paintings at the Corcoran Gallery. Like many other portraits painted by Mr. Brooke, this is considered a sympathetic and dignified depiction of a fellow Southerner, an African-American man, painted in 1880, just years after the Civil War. Brooke viewed blacks as an "integral part of Southern culture and wanted to represent them as such."