Judicial Portraits
U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia

Reggie B. Walton Walton, Reggie B.

Portait Ceremony
Program of Ceremony: November 4, 2016

Dates Served
2001 -

Biographical Sketch
Born 1949 in North Charleroi, PA

Federal Judicial Service:
Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia
Nominated by George W. Bush on September 4, 2001, to a seat vacated by Stanley Sporkin. Confirmed by the Senate on September 21, 2001, and received commission on September 24, 2001. Assumed senior status on December 31, 2015.

Judge, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, 2007-2014; presiding judge, 2013-2014

Education:
West Virginia State College, B.A., 1971
American University, Washington College of Law, J.D., 1974

Professional Career:
Staff attorney, Defender Association of Philadelphia [Pennsylvania], 1974-1976
Assistant U.S. attorney and executive assistant U.S. attorney, District of Columbia, 1976-1981
Associate judge, Superior Court of the District of Columbia, 1981-1989, 1991-2001
Associate director, Office of National Drug Control Policy, 1989-1991
Senior White House advisor for crime, Executive Office of the President, 1991


Nominated to U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, June 20, 2001; no Senate vote

Artist
Bradley Stevens has been a professional portrait artist for over 37 years, having received Bachelor of Fine Arts and Masters of Fine Arts degrees. He copied several hundred Old Master paintings at the National Gallery of Art before he was commissioned to reproduce historic portraits by such institutions as the Smithsonian, the U.S. State Department, and the U.S. House of Representatives. Before deciding to focus solely on painting, Mr. Stevens taught drawing and portrait painting at George Washington University and Georgetown University.

Mr. Stevens' portrait of Vernon Jordan hangs in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Many of his other portraits are in the collections of a number of government institutions, universities, corporations, courts, and hospitals.